Volume 2, Issue 3, September 2019, Page: 38-43
Preliminary Data on Amphibian Diversity of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve (RFO) in Democratic Republic of the Congo
Franck Masudi Muenye Mali, Department of Ecology and Biodiversity of Earth Resources, Centre de Surveillance de la Biodiversité of the University of Kisangani, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Pionus Katuala Gatate Banda, Department of Ecology and Animal Management, Faculty of Science, University of Kisangani, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Zacharie Chifundera Kusamba, Department of Biology, Centre de Recherche en Sciences Naturelles de Lwiro, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Gabriel Badjedjea Babangenge, Department of Ecology and Aquatic Biodiversity, Biodiversity Monitoring Centre, University of Kisangani, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo
Jean Robert Kambili Sebe, Institut Supérieur de Développement Rural d’Amadi, Poko City, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Albert Lotana Lokasola, Reserve Naturelle de Kokolopori (BCI Conservation), Mbandaka City, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Corneille Ewango, Department of Ecosystem Management, Faculty of Management of Renewable Natural Resources, University of Kisangani, Kisangani City, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Guy Crispin Gembu Tungaluna, Department of Ecology and Biodiversity of Earth Resources, Centre de Surveillance de la Biodiversité of the University of Kisangani, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo; Department of Ecology and Animal Management, Faculty of Science, University of Kisangani, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Dudu Akaibe, Department of Ecology and Animal Management, Faculty of Science, University of Kisangani, Kisangani, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Received: Jul. 4, 2019;       Accepted: Sep. 11, 2019;       Published: Oct. 10, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajz.20190203.11      View  39      Downloads  10
Abstract
Amphibians are poorly known in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve (RFO) in DRC, and amphibians are identified as one of the most threatened animal taxa among vertebrates living on Earth. The aim of this study was to inventory amphibians in the Okapi Wildlife Reserve. To do this, amphibians were caught by hand during the day (between 06:00–08:00 hrs) and at night (between 18:00–20:00 hrs). All specimens were photographed, labelled, and preserved in ethanol (70%). Specimens were located by sight and sound. In two sessions of 10 days each, 692 specimens were caught, representing 53 species, 17 genera and 11 families. All the inventoried species belong to the Order Anura. Several specimens could not be identified to species. The family representation included Hyperoliidae (159 specimens: 22.97%), Pyxicephalidae (8 specimens (1.15%)), Arthroleptidae (54 individuals: 7.80%), Rhacophoridae (2 specimens: 0.28%), Hemisotidae (34 specimens: 4.91%), Dicroglossidae (123 specimens: 17.77%), Ranidae (174 individuals: 25.14%), Phrynobatrachidae (3 individuals: 0.43%), Ptychadenidae (22 specimens: 3.17%), Bufonidae (45 specimens: 6.5%) and Pipidae (68 individuals: 9.82%). The results of this research are preliminary, but they are very interesting because they will allow the Reserve authorities to know the amphibians of the RFO and to have a scientific basis for a possible drafting or implementation of the conservation plan and the protection of wetlands.
Keywords
Biodiversity, Amphibians, Habitat Loss, Okapi Wildlife Reserve, Ituri Forest, Epulu, DRC
To cite this article
Franck Masudi Muenye Mali, Pionus Katuala Gatate Banda, Zacharie Chifundera Kusamba, Gabriel Badjedjea Babangenge, Jean Robert Kambili Sebe, Albert Lotana Lokasola, Corneille Ewango, Guy Crispin Gembu Tungaluna, Dudu Akaibe, Preliminary Data on Amphibian Diversity of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve (RFO) in Democratic Republic of the Congo, American Journal of Zoology. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2019, pp. 38-43. doi: 10.11648/j.ajz.20190203.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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